State & District Testing Information

District Testing Information

https://www.livebinders.com/media/get/MTg4NTQ1MTg=State Testing Information  smiley

2018- 2019 Test Administration Windows

Assessment Blueprints - https://www.tn.gov/education/assessment/tcap-blueprints.html

TCAP for Grades 3–8

Overview:

Each subject-area test is divided into multiple subparts and will be administered during one testing window at the end of the school year.

  • English language arts (4 subparts) will assess the Tennessee Academic Standards through literary and informational texts requiring students to demonstrate the ability to read closely, analyze text, answer text-dependent questions, provide a written response to a prompt, and demonstrate command of the English language. Additionally, in grades 3 and 4, fluency, comprehension, and listening skills are measured.
  • Mathematics (3 subparts) will consist of both calculator permitted and calculator prohibited subparts. It assesses the Tennessee Academic Standards requiring students to demonstrate a deep conceptual understanding of mathematics, number sense, fluency, problem solving and an understanding of the grade-level horizontal coherence embedded within the standards. The mathematics test will focus approximately 70 percent of the assessment items on major work of the grade and approximately 30 percent of the items on supporting work.
  • Science (1 subpart in grades 3-4; 2 subparts in grades 5-8) will assess the current Tennessee Academic Standards requiring students to demonstrate a deep conceptual understanding of scientific concepts in Life Science, Earth and Space Science and Physical Science.
  • Social studies (1 subpart in grades 3-4; 2 subparts in grades 5-8) will assess the current Tennessee Academic Standards for social studies requiring students to demonstrate historical awareness, geographical understanding and the ability to analyze primary source documents.

Required:yes

Yes

Federal and State Law:

Administered in accordance with the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) of 2015 and T.C.A. § 49-1-602 pertaining to district and school accountability. Modified assessments in Braille and large print are also provided in accordance with the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) of 1990.

Purpose & Use:

The TCAP tests are designed to assess true student understanding and not just basic memorization and test-taking skills. TCAP measures student understanding of our state standards.

Test Items

Files containing questions from previous TNReady assessments are available on the following subjects/pages:

 

Districts may select a more specific testing window within the state’s testing window of April 16 through May 4. However, English subpart 1, which includes a written response, must be administered in the first week.

Length of Assessment

https://www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/education/testing/tst_tcap_assessment_times_2018-19.pdf

 

Results to Districts:

Raw data is provided to districts at the very end of school year. This information may be used to help calculate final grades for report cards. State law requires TCAP scores be included as a percentage of a student’s grade in grades 3–8. Districts do have the flexibility, as provided in state law, to exclude TNReady data from student grades if the data is not available at least five instructional days before the last day for students.

Results to Parents & Students:

Score reports from the 2017-18 school year for grades 3–8 were provided to districts in fall 2018 to distributed to parents.

 

TCAP End-of-Course Assessments

Fall UCHS EOC Testing Dates:

Nov 26- Eng II (Subpart 1- writing)

Nov 27- US History (Subpart 1-writing)

Dec 4,5 - Alg II (subparts 1,2,3) , Eng II (subparts 2,3,4)

Dec 6 & 7- US History (subparts 2 & 3), Geometry (subparts 1,2)

Dec 11- Geometry (subpart 3), Biology I

Dec 12 - Makeups

 

Overview:

Each subject-area test is divided into multiple subparts and will be administered during one testing window at the end of the course.

  • English I, English II 4 subparts) assess the Tennessee Academic Standards through literary and informational texts requiring students to demonstrate the ability to read closely, analyze text, answer text-dependent questions, provide a written response to a prompt, and demonstrate command of the English language.
  • Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II and Integrated Math III (3 subparts) will consist of both calculator permitted and calculator prohibited subparts. Each assesses the Tennessee Academic Standards requiring students to demonstrate a deep conceptual understanding of mathematics, fluency, problem-solving, and an understanding of the grade-level horizontal coherence embedded within the standards. The mathematics test will focus approximately 60 percent of the assessment items on major work of the grade and approximately 40 percent of the items on supporting work.
  • Biology will assess current Tennessee Academic Standards requiring students to demonstrate a deep understanding of scientific inquiry, engineering and technology as related to the scientific concepts in the course.
  • U.S. History and Geography (3 subparts) will consist of a written response item requiring students to provide a response to a prompt with the use of several sources as well as multiple choice and multiple select items. Students will be assessed on the current Tennessee Academic Standards and be required to demonstrate a deep understanding of civics, economics, geography within the context of U.S. History with special attention to Tennessee connections.

Required:yes

Yes

Federal and State Law:

Administered in accordance with the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) of 2015 and T.C.A. § 49-1-602 pertaining to district and school accountability. Modified assessments in Braille and large print are also provided in accordance with the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) of 1990.

Purpose & Use:

The TCAP tests are designed to assess true student understanding and not just basic memorization and test-taking skills. TCAP measures student understanding of our state standards. TCAP EOC assessments are given to help measure how much a student grows academically in a particular content area.

Administration Window:

Districts may select a more specific testing window within the state’s testing window of November 26 through December 14 for fall block schedule and April 15 through May  for spring block and traditional schedules. Subpart 1 of the English language arts and U.S. History/Geography assessments, which include written responses, must be administered the first week of the administration window.

Length of Assessment

 

English I / II Subpart 1: 85 minutes (writing) Subpart 2: 50 minutes Subpart 3: 95 minutes Total: 230 minutes
Algebra I / II Subpart 1: 35 minutes (no calculator) Subpart 2: 50 minutes (calculator) Subpart 3: 60 minutes (calculator) Total: 145 minutes
Geometry Subpart 1: 35 minutes (no calculator) Subpart 2: 50 minutes (calculator) Subpart 3: 60 minutes (calculator) Total: 145 minutes
Biology *Field Test* Biology I Subpart 1: 75 minutes Total: 75 minutes
U.S. History Subpart 1: 50 minutes (writing) Subpart 2: 45 minutes Subpart 3: 45 minutes Total: 140 minutes

Raw data is provided to districts at the very end of school year (districts will receive fall block data at the very end of the first semester). This information may be used to help calculate final grades for report cards. State board policy requires TCAP scores be included as a percentage of a high school student’ end-of-course grades. Districts do have the flexibility, as provided in policy, to exclude TNReady data from student grades if the data is not available at least five instructional days before the last day for students.Results to Districts:

Results to Parents & Students:

 

Score reports from the 2017-18 school year for grades 3–8 were provided to districts in fall 2018 to distributed to parents.

 

MSAA for Students with Disabilities

Overview:

The Multi-State Alternate Assessment (MSAA) is the English language arts and math assessment for students in grades 3–8 and grade 11 with the most significant cognitive disabilities. MSAA is administered online by the teacher.

Required:yes

Yes

Federal and State Law:

The development of alternate achievement standards for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities is authorized under a department regulation (34 C.F.R. Part 200) published on December 9, 2003, and T.C.A § 49-1-612. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Title I require inclusion of all students with disabilities in the state assessment system.

Purpose & Use:

This test is given to help measure how much a student grows academically over the course of a school year.

Administration Window:

March 18–May 3

Length of Assessment:

Students are given the assessment during class time throughout the window based on student needs and class schedules.

Results to Districts:

Districts receive individual performance reports which detail student performance in early summer.

Results to Parents & Students:

Districts can choose how and when to share these reports with parents.

 

TCAP-Alt for Students with Disabilities

Overview:

TCAP-Alt is the assessment for science and social studies for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities. Students are assessed in grades 3–8 for both science and social studies and in grade 10 for Biology. TCAP-Alt is administrated via paper by the teacher.

Required:yes

Yes

Federal and State Law:

The development of alternate achievement standards for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities is authorized under a department regulation (34 C.F.R. Part 200) published on December 9, 2003, and T.C.A § 49-1-612. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Title I require inclusion of all students with disabilities in the state assessment system.

Purpose & Use:

This test is given to help measure how much a student grows academically over the course of a school year.

Administration Window:

March 19–May 4

Length of Assessment:

Students are given the assessment during class time throughout the window based on student needs and class schedules.

Results to Districts:

Districts receive individual performance reports which detail student performance in early summer.

Results to Parents & Students:

Districts can choose how and when to share these reports with parents.

 

ACCESS for English Learners

Overview:

English Learners will take the ACCESS for ELLs to determine language proficiency. ACCESS assesses students in the four language domains: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Required:

Yes

Federal and State Law:

Administered in accordance with the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) of 2015.

Purpose & Use:

Administered to English Learners to evaluate English proficiency.

Administration Window:

Mach 4–April 13

Length of Assessment:

The test is self-paced with target administration times for each section of the test as follows:

  • Listening: Up to 40 minutes
  • Reading: Up to 35 minutes
  • Speaking: Up to 30 minutes
  • Writing Tier A: Up to 45 minutes
  • Writing Tiers B/C: Up to 60 minutes

Results to Districts:

Districts receive individual performance reports which detail student performance in early summer.

Results to Parents & Students:

Districts can choose how and when to share these reports with parents.

 

ACT and SAT

Overview:

Students in Tennessee are required to take a college entrance exam (either the ACT or SAT) in the eleventh grade. This is now a graduation requirement for student seeking a regular or honors diploma. Districts in Tennessee contract with ACT to provide an opportunity to take the ACT at their own school during the school day at no cost to the student.

Required:yes

Yes

Federal and State Law:

Administered in accordance with T.C.A § 49-6-6001(b).

Purpose & Use:

Our vision for student success in Tennessee is that all students are equipped with the knowledge and skills to successfully embark on their chosen path in life. Empowering our students to pursue the education and training that matches their chosen career pathway is essential to this vision. In order to prepare our students with the knowledge and skills valued by both employers and postsecondary educators, the department has set two major strategic goals:

  • By 2020, the average composite score on the ACT (or equivalent on the SAT) will be a 21.
  • By 2020, the majority of high school graduates will be on track to receive a postsecondary degree or credential.

Administration Window:

ACT state testing dates

Paper testing: March 12, April 2, and April 23, 2019

Accommodations window: March 19-April 2, 2019

2018 - 2019 ACT Test Dates and Registration

ACT National Test Dates 

Registration Deadline 

Late Registration Deadline 

September 8, 2018

August 12, 2018

August 26, 2018

October 27, 2018

September 28, 2018

October 14, 2018

December 8, 2018

November 2, 2018

November 19, 2018

February 9, 2019

January 11, 2019

January 18, 2019

April 13, 2019

March 8, 2019

March 25, 2019

June 8, 2019

May 3, 2019

May 20, 2019

July 13, 2019*

June 14, 2019

June 24, 2019

 

SAT

SAT Test Dates 2018-19 (International)

Test Date Registration Deadline    Online Score Release
December 1, 2018   November 2, 2018 December 14, 2018
March 9, 2019** February 8, 2019 March 22, 2019
May 4, 2019 April 5, 2019 May 17, 2019
June 1, 2019* May 3, 2019 July 10, 2019

Length of Assessment:

ACT:

English: 45 minutes

Math: 60 minutes

Reading: 35 minutes

Science: 35 minutes

SAT:

25-minute essay

Six 25-minute sections (mathematics, critical reading and writing)

Two 20-minute sections (mathematics, critical reading and writing)

10-minute multiple choice writing section

Results to Districts:

District receive ACT results 2-3 months after state testing is complete.

Results to Parents & Students:

ACT results are delivered to parents and students 3-8 weeks after the assessment. SAT results are delivered to parents and students.

 

National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)

Overview:

The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is the largest nationally representative and continuing assessment of what America's students know and can do in various subject areas. Assessments are conducted periodically in mathematics, reading, science, writing, the arts, civics, economics, geography, U.S. history, and in Technology and Engineering Literacy (TEL). In 2017, NAEP began administering digitally based assessments (DBA) for mathematics, reading, and writing, with additional subjects to be added in 2018 and 2019. Only a small sample of Tennessee fourth, eighth, and twelfth graders will take this test. The representative sample group is chosen by NAEP each year. NAEP alternates sample sizes every other year, with even-year assessments being a national sample, and odd-year assessments being state samples.

Required:

Yes, NAEP is required for grade 4, 8 and 12 students at selected schools.

Federal and State Law:

Administered in accordance with the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) of 2015, which requires the state to participate in the biennial state academic assessments of fourth and eighth grade reading and mathematics. Districts that receive Title I funds are required to participate.

Purpose & Use:

NAEP assessments are administered uniformly using the same sets of test booklets across the nation. NAEP results serve as a common metric for all states and selected urban districts. The assessment stays essentially the same from year to year, with only carefully documented changes. This permits NAEP to provide a clear picture of student academic progress over time. In even-numbered years, NAEP measures Tennessee student’s academic achievement against students in other states also taking this test.

Administration Window:

January 29-March 9, 2018

Length of Assessment:

60–90 minutes

Results to Districts:

District-level results are not provided.

Results to Parents & Students:

Student-level results are not provided.

 

Operational Testing vs. Field Testing

The majority of tests are operational. This means that the test is officially scored, and results will be shared with districts, schools, teachers, and students. Some tests, however, are field tests. This means that the test isn't officially scored and reported; rather, it provides valuable information to the department of education in order to inform future test development.

Sometimes students take stand-alone field tests where the entire test would not be officially scored and reported but would instead be used to help the department design future tests.  In most cases, field test questions are included within operational tests. In this scenario, a student would not know which question was a field test question and which questions was an operational test question. Student responses to the field test questions would not "count" toward a student's score on the test, but their responses would help the department of education design future test questions.  Field tests strengthen future operational tests by ensuring each question measures what our students should know and can do.

 

 

Local Testing

CASE Benchmark Assessments

Collaborative Assessment Solutions for Educators


In order to meet the needs of every student and ensure mastery of standards, teachers want and need timely feedback on skills mastered by every student. TE21’s CASE Benchmark Assessments are designed to gauge the academic progress of students and to provide timely feedback that can be used by teachers to guide instruction. These benchmark assessments can be administered as nine-week assessments, mid-year assessments, or final comprehensive tests prior to administration of the state test, and valuable data is available within a 72-hour time frame. The benchmark assessments, which are aligned to College- and Career-Ready Standards/Common Core State Standards (CCSS), provide valuable data regarding all students’ knowledge of the standards. 

Questions Align to State Standards
Teachers who administer TE21’s CASE Benchmark Assessments like that our benchmark questions are formatted and designed to mirror best practices for assessing standards and that CASE reports provide diagnostic data to target instruction. 

CASE Benchmark Assessments for grades kindergarten through high school are available for English Language Arts and Mathematics. CASE Benchmark Assessments provides pre-made or custom benchmarks based on a district’s or school’s needs. Other features include:  
 
  • The majority of questions measure higher order thinking.
  • Questions are tightly aligned with state standards (College- and Career-Ready Standards/Common Core Standards). 
  • Content vocabulary is appropriate for the subject/level.


TE21 now delivers CASE Benchmark Assessments online and CASE Item Bank through the enCASE platform, as well as, a variety of other platforms, providing educators with even more solutions to measure student progress and facilitate learning. In an effort to deliver the most effective testing experiences, we will collaborate with districts and schools to determine the best platforms to meet their specific needs and system requirements. 

CASE Local Level District Assessments

Language Arts - Kindergarten - 11 

Math - 2 - 9

Science - 3 - 8

 

AimsWeb Benchmark Windows:

Fall: 

Winter: 

Spring: 

college career ready assessment